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Current News in Higher Ed

•The University of Connecticut is offering the nations first masters degree program in homeland security. Seventy people have applied for what is expected to be a class of 30 in the fall. The 36-credit program would include curriculum offered by both UConn and the Naval Postgraduate School. In all, students would spend just five weeks of a 20-month program at UConn's main campus in Storrs. The rest of the program would be done online. (Connecticut Post, 6/27/05)
•The University of Connecticut is offering the nation's first master's degree program in homeland security. Seventy people have applied for what is expected to be a class of 30 in the fall. The 36-credit program would include curriculum offered by both UConn and the Naval Postgraduate School. In all, students would spend just five weeks of a 20-month program at UConn's main campus in Storrs. The rest of the program would be done online. (Connecticut Post, 6/27/05)

•The Department of Defense began work with a private marketing firm June 22 to create a database of all high school students (ages 16-18) and college students. The effect is aimed at increasing military recruits. The database will include each student's Social Security number, birthday, e-mail address, GPA, ethnicity and subjects they are studying. Privacy advocates voiced concerns that the department is using a private firm to evade federal laws that restrict the government from collecting or holding citizen information. According to the Pentagon, students who provide detailed personal information can choose to opt out of the program, and will not be contacted. (The Washington Post, 6/23/05)

• More than 100 students who failed their classes at the University of Kansas last semester found out who shared their misfortune. The school's Office of Student Financial Aid sent an e-mail to 119 students notifying them that they were in jeopardy of having their aid revoked. But the names of the students were included on the e-mail address list—meaning everyone who got the e-mail could see the names of all the other recipients. (CNN.com/Associated Press, 6/20/05)

•Minorities are making small gains in science jobs. According to the Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology, Hispanics account for about 5.3 percent of all U.S. science professionals, up from 3.7 percent 10 years ago. for African-Americans hold about 6.2 percent of the nation's science jobs. But their participation has fallen since 2000, when black participation edged above 7 percent. (CNET News.com, 6/17/05)

•New York University is moving to close down its graduate students union when its contract expires Aug. 31. (The New York Times, 6/17/05)