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Community colleges staking claim on homeland security education

Last weekend, about 20 community college presidents gathered in Washington, D.C., to develop a long-term strategy and national standards for homeland security education, according to CNN.
Last weekend, about 20 community college presidents gathered in Washington, D.C., to develop a long-term strategy and national standards for homeland security education, according to CNN.

Homeland security classes have been springing up nationwide since Sept. 11, 2001. But they seem centralized at community colleges, which educate more than 80 percent of the country's fire, police and emergency medical personnel. Monroe Community College (Rochester, NY) has opened the Homeland Security Management Institute. Owens Community College (Toledo, Ohio) is breaking ground on a $10 million homeland security center, complete with an anti-terrorism simulation center, this April.

Ellen Gordon, Iowa's homeland security adviser and a member of the Senior Advisory Council for the Department of Homeland Security, predicts that community colleges will be the “base for training and education for all the different areas within our homeland security” within the next 20-25 years.