Go back

Christian colleges are booming

According to Time magazines Feb. 2 edition, enrollment in Christ-centered colleges has climbed 27 percent since 1997–three times as fast as the growth at all four-year institutions.

Rebecca Winters writes that these colleges are reinventing themselves in the modern age by understanding that most college students are exploring spirituality. According to a recent study at UCLA, more than 75 percent of college juniors say they discuss religion and spirituality with their friends, but 62 percent say their professors never encourage such discussion in class.
According to Time magazine's Feb. 2 edition, enrollment in “Christ-centered” colleges has climbed 27 percent since 1997—three times as fast as the growth at all four-year institutions.

Rebecca Winters writes that these colleges are reinventing themselves in the modern age by understanding that most college students are exploring spirituality. According to a recent study at UCLA, more than 75 percent of college juniors say they discuss religion and spirituality with their friends, but 62 percent say their professors never encourage such discussion in class.

At Azusa Pacific University (APU), the second largest evangelical Christian college in the nation, professors must sign a pledge that they “believe the Bible to be the inspired, the only infallible, authoritative word of God.” The pledge has cost the school a $3.4 million early-education government contract, but in the past year, donors have boosted the school's donations 50 percent.