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Brooklyn artist, APSU students turn Woodward Library inside out

Austin Peay art students are looking forward to late nights in the library thanks to installation artist-in-residence Chris Doyle.

As part of APSUs Creative Capital Artist Series, Doyle will work with students throughout March collecting video and photographs of Felix G. Woodward Library after hours. The result will be a multimedia installation, Search Engine, which includes a large video projection onto the side of the library.
Austin Peay art students are looking forward to late nights in the library thanks to installation artist-in-residence Chris Doyle.

As part of APSU's Creative Capital Artist Series, Doyle will work with students throughout March collecting video and photographs of Felix G. Woodward Library after hours. The result will be a multimedia installation, “Search Engine,” which includes a large video projection onto the side of the library.

“The project intends to explore several ideas,” says Doyle. “It attempts to turn the building inside out, exposing the richness and complexity of its contents onto the exterior. It engages the students in a low-tech, metaphorical examination of the mechanism of the search engine as a method for collecting information, and expresses the heroic and frustratingly monumental task of learning.”

The evolution of the project may be observed weekdays from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturday and 1-4 p.m. on Sunday, March 2-April 4, in Trahern Gallery.

Doyle will discuss his work at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 11, in Trahern Gallery. A reception will follow from 8-10 p.m.

“Search Engine” will be projected from 8-10 p.m., Thursday-Saturday, March 11-13 on the façade of Felix. G. Woodward Library.

Trained as an architect at Harvard University, Doyle is known for projects focusing on the objects of ordinary life, and his ability to transform perceptions of them. His April 2000 project, titled “Leap,” included film of 400 New York residents jumping as high as they could. Doyle interviewed each participant about their desires and aspirations, and included the information in materials distributed with the installation.

The lecture, exhibit and video projection are free and open to the public. For further information, telephone 7334.
—Terry Stringer