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Award-winning writer Ander Monson to read at APSU

On Ander Monsons Web site, the award-winning writer said he plans to give readings sometime soon at locations such as your living room and your bedroom.

I read well in enclosed spaces, he explains on the site.

Anyone familiar with Monsons sense of humor and form-defying writing style would argue that he likely reads well anywhere. For those who dont know much about the Michigan-based writer, theyll get a chance to hear him read at a more conventional location on Sept. 15 when he stops by Austin Peay State University.
On Ander Monson's Web site, the award-winning writer said he plans to give readings sometime soon at locations such as “your living room” and “your bedroom.”

“I read well in enclosed spaces,” he explains on the site.

Anyone familiar with Monson's sense of humor and form-defying writing style would argue that he likely reads well anywhere. For those who don't know much about the Michigan-based writer, they'll get a chance to hear him read at a more conventional location on Sept. 15 when he stops by Austin Peay State University.

For the last several years, Monson has been pushing the bounds of creativity in writing, creating essays in non-essay forms such as the Harvard Outline, the mathematical proof and, as odd as it sounds, the index format.

In 2006, Graywolf Press, one of the nation's leading nonprofit literary publishers, awarded him their Nonfiction Prize for his strange blend of essays “Neck Deep and Other Predicaments.”

“Ander Monson is so cunning and quick-witted as an essayist that it's almost easy to miss just how touching, how human, how stubbornly elegiac his writing can be,” Robert Polito, a judge for the prize, wrote in a statement that introduces the book.

Amy Wright, an APSU English professor, plans to teach from this book in her fall creative nonfiction writing class.

Monson is also the author of the novel “Other Electricities,” the poetry collection “Vacationland” and a new book of, in his words, “essay sweetness” titled “Vanishing Point,” to be published from Graywolf this April.

His reading, which is free and open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. in Room 303 of the Morgan University Center. For information, please contact Susan Wallace with the Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts at 931-221-7031 or wallacess@apsu.edu. -- Charles Booth