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Austin Peay students help the visually impaired “see” production

During last weeks production of Dinner with Friends, John Moseleys Audio in Media class wrote, narrated and produced an audio narrative track designed to help visually impaired audience members see the production.

The audio track, which was delivered through a state-of-the-art wireless headphone system to visually impaired audience members, provides verbal clues to actions on the stage.
During last week's production of “Dinner with Friends,” John Moseley's Audio in Media class wrote, narrated and produced an audio narrative track designed to help visually impaired audience members “see” the production.

The audio track, which was delivered through a state-of-the-art wireless headphone system to visually impaired audience members, provides verbal clues to actions on the stage.

“This scenic narrative approach helps to explain the physical and emotional relationships between the actors, the clothing and set design involved in a specific scene and the use of lighting in the overall production process,” says Moseley, assistant professor of communications. “It is written in such a way that it will not interfere with the dialogue of the actors, but will fill in spaces without dialogue in a manner that will help to explain the actors' involvement in the scene.”

For example, while the theatre is still dark, an audience member using the track might hear the following description: “As this scene opens, we find Gabe and Karen sitting together on the couch. Both appear to be deep in thought.”

It's a technique widely used in performance facilities around the world, as well as numerous television and movie productions, to enhance the theatre experience for patrons who are visually impaired, according to Moseley.

“Dinner with Friends” was the third full APSU production offered with a descriptive audio track, according to Moseley.
—Rebecca Mackey