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Austin Peay student named one of America's best

Tamira Cole is not your typical college sophomore. The Austin Peay student balances a rigorous academic schedule, dozens of extracurricular activities–and shes been named one of the top 100 college students in the nation.

Cole will be listed among the nations top students in the Feb. 12 issue of USA Today. She received an Honorable Mention honor out of 600 nominees from across the nation.
Tamira Cole is not your typical college sophomore. The Austin Peay student balances a rigorous academic schedule, dozens of extracurricular activities—and she's been named one of the top 100 college students in the nation.

Cole will be listed among the nation's top students in the Feb. 12 issue of USA Today. She received an Honorable Mention honor out of 600 nominees from across the nation.

“My mother and grandmother were so excited that they were trying their hardest to believe it and digest the day and time I'd be listed in USA Today,” says Cole. “I was shocked to even be nominated, let alone to actually be one of the top 100.”

To date, this English major (with a double minor in journalism and psychology) has volunteered more than 1,000 community service hours. She is the youngest member of the Tennessee 4-H Foundation Board of Directors, where she serves as a state youth coordinator and recently founded ACTIVE A.C.E.S. and BOOK B.U.G.S., programs supported by Madison County 4-H.

Cole is a magna cum laude Dean's List Scholar, National Honor Roll Winner and a member of Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society, the National Scholars Honor Society and Sigma Tau Delta International English Honor Society.

She is an associate justice on the Student Government Association's Student Tribunal, features editor for the student newspaper The All State, news editor for AP Magazine, a student-produced TV show, a Governors Ambassador, Residence Hall Association executive secretary and a residence hall president.

In 2003, she became the first African American member of APSU's Chi Omega Women's Fraternity.

Cole served as vice president of National Health Occupations of America Region II, which has a national membership of 70,000, from 2002-03. She was awarded the 2002 Emancipation Award of Excellence for her stellar record of achievements, including being one of the top African Americans in Tennessee 4-H.

She says, “To be the first student from APSU ever selected is incredible. I would have not made it this far if it weren't for such supportive family members, friends, teachers, coaches, faculty and staff, sponsors and advisers of student organizations and my sorority sisters.

“Oftentimes, we feel as though we can't achieve something because we're not from a big- time university or have a perfect 4.0. I'm proof that hard work, determination, religious faith, diligence, compassion and the will to help others are the keys to success.”
—Rebecca Mackey