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Austin Peay prepares to reduce the hours for most degrees

November 25, 2003


Two years ago, the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) recommended that system schools "reduce the number of hours required for graduation to 120 credit hours for baccalaureate degrees." While the reduction plan proposals were due Sept. 30, 2003, the schedules for implementation vary.

So, where does Austin Peay stand?
November 25, 2003


Two years ago, the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) recommended that system schools "reduce the number of hours required for graduation to 120 credit hours for baccalaureate degrees." While the reduction plan proposals were due Sept. 30, 2003, the schedules for implementation vary.

So, where does Austin Peay stand?

According to Dr. Joe Filippo, assistant vice president for academic affairs, the University has created several TBR task forces to examine selected degree programs, as well as the “issues and problems in different disciplines” that would make reducing the hours difficult.

“There will be some exceptions made for programs that exceed 120 hours due to licensure and/or accreditation requirements,” Filippo says. “The result is, while it is true that most programs will fit the 120-hour mold, several programs will run between 120 and 124 hours, with music education being given approval to go as high as 128 hours.”

The reduction plans are expected to come before TBR for approval this December. The Tennessee Higher Education Commission will review them for final approval in January 2004.

Filippo says, “Because there have been very recent changes in what will be required of students, many individual degree programs are still in the process of being re-worked. However, almost all of them will have a new look for Fall 2004.

“Exceptions are music programs, art education and the biology teaching major. They will be required to make their reductions in time for the 2004-05 APSU Bulletin.”

According to Filippo, current students may choose which bulletin they wish to graduate under, but they must fulfill all of the requirements in a single bulletin. He says, “For example, they cannot select the general education requirements in one bulletin, but the requirements for their major in another bulletin. All requirements must be met through a single bulletin.”
—Rebecca Mackey