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Astronomy prof's article among most cited

Any scholar researching the history of physics and astronomy might consider reading a paper authored by a faculty member at Austin Peay State University whose work is climbing the list of most referenced papers in the world.

Dr. J. Allyn Smith, assistant professor of physics and astronomy, wrote The ugriz Standard Star Network, published in 2002 in The Astronomical Journal. This article, which can be found online at www.sdss.org, describes the system of calibration stars for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.
Any scholar researching the history of physics and astronomy might consider reading a paper authored by a faculty member at Austin Peay State University whose work is climbing the list of most referenced papers in the world.

Dr. J. Allyn Smith, assistant professor of physics and astronomy, wrote “The u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star Network,” published in 2002 in The Astronomical Journal. This article, which can be found online at www.sdss.org, describes the system of calibration stars for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

Last year, the article was the fourth most referenced paper in astronomical literature. As of Monday, April 2, 2007, the paper ranks as the 1,111th most referenced paper in all of physics and astronomy out of more than 2.8 million papers dating back to 1665.

Specifically, in The Astronomical Journal database, Smith's paper is No. 28 of 20,408 articles published since 1849, the inception of the journal. “The editor of the Astronomical Journal believes it will be in the top 250 of all time (astronomy papers) within the next two years,” said Dr. Jaime Taylor, professor and chair of physics and astronomy at APSU.

Smith said only 92 papers in the history of astronomy have more than 1,000 citations, and 464 have been referenced more than 500 times. More than 400 citations is considered a major publication and more than 500 is considered a significant publication.

Smith earned a Ph.D., two Master of Science degrees and a bachelor's degree all from the Florida Institute of Technology. Formerly a visiting professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Wyoming, Smith has refereed nearly 100 publications and published several abstracts. Currently, he has four research projects under way.

From 1982-84, Smith was a space shuttle orbiter test conductor at the Rockwell International Corp. at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., and later became a senior space shuttle test conductor with Lockheed Space Operations Co.

For more information, contact Smith by telephone at (931) 221-6104 or by e-mail at smithj@apsu.edu. -- Melony Leazer