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APSU shows support for soldiers with ribbons, counseling, veterans' group

April 9, 2003

APSU has a large number of students, faculty and staff with family members in the military. Those whose relatives were recently deployed to the Middle East now face a new stress: the knowledge their loved one is in danger.

As a caring community, APSU faculty, staff and students are trying to find significant ways to support the military and military family members who are part of the University.
April 9, 2003

APSU has a large number of students, faculty and staff with family members in the military. Those whose relatives were recently deployed to the Middle East now face a new stress: the knowledge their loved one is in danger.

As a caring community, APSU faculty, staff and students are trying to find significant ways to support the military and military family members who are part of the University.

On Wednesday, April 2, 80 large yellow ribbons were hung on trees and lampposts along the front of campus. They were made and hung through a joint effort of the APSU Community Activities Committee, Chi Delta Chi Veterans Organization and other University volunteers. Darolyn Porter, retention specialist, taught volunteers how to make the bows.

According to Greg Schutz, director of institutional effectiveness, when the bows become weathered, they will be replaced with new ones. Schutz said, “The hanging of yellow bows along the front of the Austin Peay campus will continue until the 101st and other Fort Campbell units return home.”

Jackie Struckmeyer, internal auditor and a member of the Community Activities Committee, extends special thanks to all volunteers who helped with the Yellow-Ribbon Project.

Counseling Services

APSU's Office of Counseling and Testing is staffed by trained professionals who are willing and able to provide an understanding ear for those caught in the chronic angst of war.

In addition to possessing special knowledge in counseling, staff are familiar with the services provided at Fort Campbell for military family members and can guide those in need to the correct on-post office. Dr. Lowell Roddy, assistant director, is an Army veteran, having served 26 years in active duty with two stints at Fort Campbell. He also served six years as an Army Reserve chaplain.

Roddy has volunteered to establish a support group on campus for military family members. If you are interested, telephone him at 6162.

Student-Veterans Organization

Chi Delta Chi, a student organization specifically for veterans, was established at APSU recently. The president and co-founder is Don Ferguson, a U.S. Army veteran. Chi Delta Chi has established a Help Line for APSU military family members. Ferguson promises military family members with questions that a Chi Delta Chi member will call back within 24 hours with an answer.

Members of Chi Delta Chi also are planning to provide a dinner once a month for military families. To talk with Ferguson, telephone 5283 or 7307.