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APSU presents a lecture by Dr. Minoa Uffelman

As part of the Faculty Research Forum Series, Austin Peay State University presents a lecture by Dr. Minoa Uffelman, assistant professor of history.

Uffelmans talk, Tomato Clubs as Salvation: Virginia P. Moores Attempts to Educate Girls to Improve Southern Rural Society, will be given from 3-4:30 p.m., Thursday, March 2 in the Morgan University Center, Room 303.
As part of the Faculty Research Forum Series, Austin Peay State University presents a lecture by Dr. Minoa Uffelman, assistant professor of history.

Uffelman's talk, “Tomato Clubs as Salvation: Virginia P. Moore's Attempts to Educate Girls to Improve Southern Rural Society,” will be given from 3-4:30 p.m., Thursday, March 2 in the Morgan University Center, Room 303.

The lecture will capture pioneer Virginia P. Moore's development of female agricultural demonstration. Uffelman says, “Moore's successful 40-year career is a testament to how an intelligent and talented woman could carve out a career in an American society not yet comfortable with female professionals.”

Moore and other agricultural reformers strived to boost the rural Southern economy and create an educated female population. Moore was particularly instrumental in developing tomato and canning clubs throughout Tennessee.

“Moore believed canning clubs created social cohesion and was a democratizing influence for society because middle-class and tenant-farming girls participated together,” says Uffelman.

A series of slides of Moore participating in canning club activities and dating roughly to 1913 will accompany the lecture.

The next Faculty Research Forum presentation, “Bear, Bo and Bowden: Leadership Lessons from Sports,” will be presented by Dr. Roy Baker and Dr. William Rayburn from 3-4:30 p.m., Thursday, April 6.

Sponsored by the Office of Academic Affairs, the Faculty Research Forum is designed to provide an opportunity for faculty to present research findings to their peers, students and other interested parties.

The monthly forums, which are open to the public at no charge, address a variety of research topics and stimulate interdisciplinary connections.

For more information, telephone the Office of Academic Affairs at (931) 221-7676. — Crissy Laubach-Young