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APSU launches internal fund-raiser; donors eligible for free Florida getaway

February 4, 2003

Sally Koch said, "Great opportunities to help others seldom come, but small ones surround us everyday."

The Office of University Advancement presented a "small" opportunity to faculty and staff at its internal giving campaign kickoff, held Tuesday, Jan. 28 in the ballroom of the UC.

Why should employees give to the University? Because the needs are great, said Shelia Boone, director of alumni and annual giving. "Last year, 400 students qualified for scholarships. We could help only 90 students."
February 4, 2003

Sally Koch said, "Great opportunities to help others seldom come, but small ones surround us everyday."

The Office of University Advancement presented a "small" opportunity to faculty and staff at its internal giving campaign kickoff, held Tuesday, Jan. 28 in the ballroom of the UC.

Why should employees give to the University? Because the needs are great, said Shelia Boone, director of alumni and annual giving. "Last year, 400 students qualified for scholarships. We could help only 90 students."

Ann Ross, former Austin Peay bookstore manager and chair of the capital campaign steering committee, offered a more practical reason: "If we don't have students, faculty and staff don't have jobs," she said to the estimated 100 people in attendance.

Ross also reminded faculty and staff that small donations, collectively, have a huge impact. "If each employee made a contribution of $25 a year, it would translate into $54,350 in three years."

President Sherry Hoppe, who took the podium after Ross, noted that the former staff member was being very modest about her contributions to the University. Ross and her son-in-law donated funds for two rooms in the Sundquist Science Complex in honor of her late husband and daughter. And Ross is planning an additional "very generous" gift to the University, according to Hoppe.

Hoppe said she had only two stipulations for the fund-raising effort. First: it had to be fun.

The kickoff event was just that, with food, fellowship and jazzy background music from Dr. David Steinquest and company. A second party is planned for June 30, when the campus campaign ends.

Adding to the fun: the grand prize. A lucky donor will win a one-week getaway in a beach-front condo on the Gulf of Mexico. The fully equipped 1,500-square-foot condo has a heated pool, hot tub and private fishing pier.

Hoppe's second stipulation for the campaign was that she never know who was giving what. "I've been involved in fund-raisers where those who hadn't given would get the evil eye." That won't be the case here, she emphasized.

"I don't want to know how much you've given," she said. "I want you to give in proportion to your capabilities."

Ultimately, Hoppe said, each of us should give because we've all received.

"Think about this place you call 'The Peay,'" she said. "About what you get from it.

("I won't mention the 3 percent raise!" she added in a humorous aside.)

"You give everyday. I recognize that. But this is your opportunity to give at another level. It doesn't matter if you give $1 a month, $25 a month or put us in your estate. Our goal is 100 percent participation.

"Give because you believe in Austin Peay and what it does for the people who pass through this institution. I won't know. But you'll know."