Go back

APSU hosts program on West Nile Virus as emerging threat

January 28, 2003

The West Nile Virus is alive and well and thriving in Tennessee.

Last year, at least 52 Tennesseans were infected with the virus; seven of them died. About 4,000 people were infected nationwide, resulting in 252 deaths.

Austin Peay is hosting a special program to provide important information to the public regarding West Nile Virus.

The event is slated for 6-7:30 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 6 in Room E-106, Sundquist Science Complex on campus. It is free and open to the public.
January 28, 2003

The West Nile Virus is alive and well and thriving in Tennessee.

Last year, at least 52 Tennesseans were infected with the virus; seven of them died. About 4,000 people were infected nationwide, resulting in 252 deaths.

Austin Peay is hosting a special program to provide important information to the public regarding West Nile Virus.

The event is slated for 6-7:30 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 6 in Room E-106, Sundquist Science Complex on campus. It is free and open to the public.

The program, titled “West Nile Virus--The Impact on Humans, Livestock and Wildlife: Prospects for the Future,” is being sponsored by the APSU Center of Excellence for Field Biology, Gateway Health Systems, DoctorsCare and the Montgomery County Health Department.

The evening's presenters will be Tennessee's newly appointed medical entomologist Kristy Gottfried; local physician and conservationist Dr. Randy Ellis; Dr. Gary Swinger, Tennessee Public Health veterinarian; and Dr. Don Dailey, a microbiologist in APSU's department of biology.

Gottfried will discuss aspects of the West Nile Virus lifecycle and mosquito control, while Swinger will evaluate concerns regarding the virus as they relate to large domestic animals as well as companion animals. Ellis will discuss human health issues related to West Nile Virus.

Dailey, who has been investigating the presence of West Nile Virus in birds this past year, will evaluate the documented and potential impacts on birds and other wildlife. Afterward, there will be a discussion session.

According to a spokesman for the Warioto Chapter of the National Audubon Society, which organized the presentation, the program should dispel some concerns, possibly raise new concerns and increase public awareness of the facts and fiction of this emerging disease.

For more information, telephone Dailey at 7440.