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APSU graduate student completes 11-week FBI National Academy course

An Austin Peay State University graduate student recently graduated from the FBI National Academy, considered by professionals in the criminal justice field to be among the most prestigious law enforcement schools.

Manny Tyndall, a Clarksville resident who plans to complete requirements for a Master of Science in Management in December 2006, attended the 11-week program from Oct. 2, 2005, to Dec. 16, 2005. He was on hiatus from graduate studies at APSU during the Fall 2005 semester to attend the academy.
An Austin Peay State University graduate student recently graduated from the FBI National Academy, considered by professionals in the criminal justice field to be among the most prestigious law enforcement schools.

Manny Tyndall, a Clarksville resident who plans to complete requirements for a Master of Science in Management in December 2006, attended the 11-week program from Oct. 2, 2005, to Dec. 16, 2005. He was on hiatus from graduate studies at APSU during the Fall 2005 semester to attend the academy.

The FBI National Academy is a professional course of study for U.S. and international law enforcement leaders to improve the administration of justice in police departments and agencies. Participation is by invitation only through a nomination process.

“Many officers wait as long as 10 years to attend,” said Tyndall, whose class included law enforcement officers from 49 states and 22 foreign countries.

During the program, participants take undergraduate and/or graduate college courses at the Quantico, Va., campus in the areas of law, behavioral science, leadership development, communication, and health and fitness.

While at the academy, Tyndall completed five graduate-level criminal justice courses, for a total of 15 hours, with the University of Virginia. He earned a Master of Science in Health and Human Performance in 1998 from APSU and a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice Administration in 1988 from Columbia College in Missouri.

He is a special agent for the Tennessee Office of Inspector General in Nashville. The office nominated Tyndall for participation in the academy.

Tyndall said graduating from the FBI program is an accomplishment, but the most rewarding aspect he gained was the partnership formed with other law enforcement officers.

“Now, if I have a law enforcement issue that is difficult to resolve, I can pick up the phone and call someone around the world who could offer a resolution to the problem,” Tyndall said. — Melony Leazer