Go back

APSU forms Woodward Society to promote campus library

On a warm Thursday evening last week, Austin Peay State University President Tim Hall posed the question, What does the library of the future look like?

With competition from the Internet and various forms of digital media, he conceded it probably wont be the traditional silent building many of us grew up visiting.

The library of the future is the one that has fewer shelves and probably fewer hardbound books, but is more of a place where people meet together, where students work together, study together and learn together.
On a warm Thursday evening last week, Austin Peay State University President Tim Hall posed the question, “What does the library of the future look like?”

With competition from the Internet and various forms of digital media, he conceded it probably won't be the traditional silent building many of us grew up visiting.

“The library of the future is the one that has fewer shelves and probably fewer hardbound books, but is more of a place where people meet together, where students work together, study together and learn together.”

In the next decade, he said, when APSU looks to build a new library, the building will be configured differently than the current Felix G. Woodward Library.

“The key difference will be there will be more places where people work and study and talk together,” he said.

To achieve this goal and generally strengthen the resources of the library, community leaders have joined with the University to form the Woodward Library Society. The group hosted its inaugural event last Thursday night, with about 200 people attending a special dinner and reading with celebrated children's author and Clarksville resident, Michael Shoulders.

The money raised from society events and memberships will go toward maintaining the Woodward Library as the “academic crown jewel” of the APSU campus.

“The library serves as more or less the hub of the University's scholastic activity,” Dottie Mann, president of the society's board of directors, said. “It's the crossroads where art students, the history professor, the marketing major all come together. It's a great meeting place.”

The society is looking to build a broad association of individuals interested in strengthening and advancing the University's library. Membership is available at different financial levels, from $5 for current students all the way up to $1,000 for the designation as “Benefactor.”

More information on the Woodward Library Society is available online at http://library.apsu.edu/society/index.html, or by contacting Chrissy Booth, director of major gifts with the APSU Advancement Office, at 221-7130 or boothc@apsu.edu. -- Charles Booth