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APSU Creative Capital Artist Lecture Series presents James Luna

September 2, 2003

Austin Peays art department presents nationally respected performance and multimedia artist James Luna as part of the 2003-04 Creative Capital Artist Lecture Series.

Lunas performance begins at 7 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 11 in the Customs House Museum and Cultural Center auditorium, Clarksville.

A Luiseno/Diegueno Indian from Californias La Jolla Reservation, Luna creates his work for a community of Indian tribes. These tribes benefit from his acclaimed efforts to destroy the Indian stereotype.
September 2, 2003

Austin Peay's art department presents nationally respected performance and multimedia artist James Luna as part of the 2003-04 Creative Capital Artist Lecture Series.

Luna's performance begins at 7 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 11 in the Customs House Museum and Cultural Center auditorium, Clarksville.

A Luiseno/Diegueno Indian from California's La Jolla Reservation, Luna creates his work for a “community of Indian tribes.” These tribes benefit from his acclaimed efforts to destroy the “Indian” stereotype.

According to Luna, "Artwork in the media of performance and installation offers an opportunity like no other for Indian people to express themselves without compromise in traditional art forms of ceremony, dance, oral traditions and contemporary thought. Within these non-traditional spaces one can use a variety of media such as objects, sounds, video, slides, so that there is no limit in how and what is expressed."

Seonid MacArthur, education curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art in La Jolla, Calif., says of Luna, “He's not so much about ritual as he is about combining his heritage and sense of ritual with humor.”

Luna's performances and visual art have been presented throughout the United States and Canada. He screened his video work at the Sundance Film Festival, the National Museum of the American Indian and the Wichita Museum of Photographic Arts.

"I've had people come to see me thinking I'm going to do a nice tom-tom dance. And as I unload, they realize this isn't what they came to hear," Luna says. "But they have every right to leaveor to laugh."

Luna is the recipient of a 1991 Bessie Award, an Intercultural Film/Video Grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and a Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium video grant.

Creative Capital is a national nonprofit organization that supports artists pursuing innovative approaches to form and content in the media, performing and visual arts in emerging fields.