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APSU to begin construction of new residence hall in Fall 2009

Austin Peay State University will begin construction of a new residence hall complex in Fall 2009.

The 416-bed facility will replace three existing residence halls on the APSU main campus: Cross, Killebrew and Rawlins. These three halls house a total of 392 students, Joe Mills, director of APSU Housing, said.

The $25.5 million complex will feature two identical buildings joined by a common lobby and other common spaces at an elbow, said Lane Lyle, architect with Lyle-Cook-Martin Architects in Clarksville.
Austin Peay State University will begin construction of a new residence hall complex in Fall 2009.

The 416-bed facility will replace three existing residence halls on the APSU main campus: Cross, Killebrew and Rawlins. These three halls house a total of 392 students, Joe Mills, director of APSU Housing, said.

The $25.5 million complex will feature two identical buildings joined by a common lobby and other common spaces at an “elbow,” said Lane Lyle, architect with Lyle-Cook-Martin Architects in Clarksville.

The ground floor of the new residence hall will include public or common spaces, lounges, meeting and game rooms, a convenience store and coffee bar, a copy center and a laundry area.

“The unique quality of this residence hall is the aspect of building in common spaces with study lounges and kitchens in each ‘pod' of the building,” Mills said. “These shared spaces were designed to get students more connected with APSU, which will result in a more quality living experience and will be a positive contributor for student retention and success.”

Students should be able to live in the new complex beginning Fall 2011.

The quality of residence halls is among the top three reasons why students choose a college or university, Mills said. He added that student retention is greater when students live on campus.

Much of the decision students make in choosing a college has to do with student housing. We want students to come here and current students to stay, knowing they have good quality residence halls in which to live.


- Joe Mills