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Alumni couple remembers APSU in estate plan with $2.3 million

APSU officials learned last month that two alumni have included the University in their estate plan.

Ken and Amy Landrum, Jacksonville, Fla., told Dr. Sherry Hoppe, APSU president, and Roy Gregory, executive director for University advancement, they recently revised their will, leaving a gift from their estate, currently valued at $2.3 million, to APSU.

Ken, a native of Clarksville, and Amy, originally from Shelbyville, lived and worked in Nashville more than 30 years, before retiring to Jacksonville in 1997.
APSU officials learned last month that two alumni have included the University in their estate plan.

Ken and Amy Landrum, Jacksonville, Fla., told Dr. Sherry Hoppe, APSU president, and Roy Gregory, executive director for University advancement, they recently revised their will, leaving a gift from their estate, currently valued at $2.3 million, to APSU.

Ken, a native of Clarksville, and Amy, originally from Shelbyville, lived and worked in Nashville more than 30 years, before retiring to Jacksonville in 1997.

Amy, a 1965 APSU graduate and elementary education major, taught third, fifth and sixth grades for 30 years at various elementary schools in the Greater Nashville area. She retired in 1996 from her work at Tulip Grove Elementary School.

A 1964 APSU graduate with a mathematics major and business administration minor, Ken worked 32 years for National Life and Accident Insurance Company/NLT (now American General/AIG), Nashville, before retiring in 1997.

The Landrums have been longtime donors to APSU. When they moved to Florida and were required to re-do their will, they decided to name APSU as a major beneficiary. They specified that their gift be used to establish a scholarship endowment in their name at APSU.

“I would not have been able to attend college had Austin Peay not been there,” said Ken. “Over the years, Amy and I have been the beneficiaries of help from other people.

“Now we want to do the same—help young people attend college. Someday, they will be able to able to give back, too. In business, we call that the ‘chain of progress.'”

Hoppe said, “Having been on the receiving end when they were in college, Ken and Amy Landrum want to help other young people attend Austin Peay. They understand the value in reaching back and giving others a hand.

“On behalf of scores of future students who will be able to attend Austin Peay because of their generosity, I offer sincerest thanks to Amy and Ken Landrum. Gifts such as theirs benefit the giver as much as those who receive.”
—Dennie Burke