Go back

Admissions recruiter finds gratification in her workand in giving

April 1, 2003

On a bright, sunny day, Heather Mattson loves to be outside. Fortunately, her work allows her to do that often. Mattson is an admissions counselor and recruiter for Austin Peay, and her travels take her on the roadand in and out of vehiclesfive days a week.

My favorite part about being a recruiter is that I get to travel and meet new people. Im a people person, she says.
April 1, 2003

On a bright, sunny day, Heather Mattson loves to be outside. Fortunately, her work allows her to do that often. Mattson is an admissions counselor and recruiter for Austin Peay, and her travels take her on the roadand in and out of vehiclesfive days a week.

“My favorite part about being a recruiter is that I get to travel and meet new people. I'm a people person,” she says.

Mattson's love of people, especially kids, and the outdoors probably comes from her summers at camp. She and her brother went to summer camp every year from the time they were nine. Mattson went back after high school graduation as a leader.

“I had so much fun, but I also learned a lot. I think that's where I began to love working with kids.”

With a bright smile on her face and sunglasses perched atop her blond, layered hair, Mattson still looks like a kid in some wayscertainly younger than her 25 years.

“People think I'm still in college sometimes,” says Mattson. “But it's ok; it helps me fit in better with the students I'm trying to recruit.”

Mattson was a student at Austin Peay at one time. She was recruited out of Mt. Juliet High School by former APSU admissions director Charles McCorkle.

As a student, she taught swimming lessons at the YMCA and worked as a lifeguard at the Austin Peay pool. She says it was a great way to get to know the students and faculty.

“I would see everyone while I was at the pool. It really helped me get to know the faculty, staff and students. I taught a lot of faculty members' kids to swim at the Y.”

She earned her degree in health and human performance in 2001 from Austin Peay and began working as a recruiter in the Office of Admissions.

Mattson says she originally applied for the job because she was graduating and needed a job, but she has grown to love it.

“Everyday it's something different. That's what I love about my job. I would probably say I have one of the best jobs on campus.”

“I love who I work with. I love the campus. I love the faculty. Austin Peay has always been really good to me, first as a student and now as an employee.”

So when asked to give to the Peay Pride Campus Campaign 2003, Mattson was eager to sign up.

“If there is something I can do, as minimal as it may be, I want to help."

Mattson's heart and personal interest lie in helping students. It's what she does everyday. So she designated her campaign contributions to go to the general scholarship fund.

“I wanted to give to the scholarship fund because I know it's going to a good cause. I know Austin Peay will be getting something in returngood students.”

“Some people think they need to give a lot to be helping. That's just not the case,” says Mattson. “Even if you are able to donate $1 or $2, that would be good.”

“I think it's important to give to Austin Peay anyway you can, whether it's financially or in other ways. Every little bit is going to help.

“It's a personal goal of mine to make sure students who need help getting into school get into school. If I give money to the Austin Peay Foundation, I am giving money for more students to come to Austin Peay.

“That's all the thanks I need.”