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2 HHP students ask questions on NPR

Two Austin Peay State University students recently submitted questions that were answered by experts on National Public Radio (NPR).

As part of their 2030 Health and Human Performance class, Carol Halliburton, Dover, Deana Porretta, Clarksville, and classmates recently listened to a story on childs play on NPR.

According to Dr. Anne Black, associate professor of health and human performance, the two students questions, along with answers by experts, were broadcast nationally on NPR.
Two Austin Peay State University students recently submitted questions that were answered by experts on National Public Radio (NPR).

As part of their 2030 Health and Human Performance class, Carol Halliburton, Dover, Deana Porretta, Clarksville, and classmates recently listened to a story on child's play on NPR.

According to Dr. Anne Black, associate professor of health and human performance, the two students' questions, along with answers by experts, were broadcast nationally on NPR.

In posting her question, Halliburton said, “Almost all people agree that video games can be a downfall for our children. Do you think that Wii gaming is going in a better direction as far as getting children moving with video games?”

Expert Adele Diamond replied, “Wii will help with visual-motor skills … but I do not think it will help with executive functions. A superior Wii player will react automatically. For improving executive functions, you need games that require children to stop and think, where their first impulse would often not lead to the best result. Certainly, a video game could be constructed that challenged function skills, but I have not seen any like that.”

Later, Porretta asked: “Does supplying children with props for unstructured imaginative play, such as simple costumes and accessories, help or hinder their level of self-regulation?”

In response, Diamond said, “The more children need to use their imaginations and hold in mind what they selected a given object would stand for, or what role each person decided to play, the better. Therefore, it's better not to use costumes or accessories that are targeted for specific scenarios…but, rather, for children to use available materials to come up with their own way to identify the fireman and what they want to stand for the water hose.”
Black indicated she was pleased that her two students' questions were interesting enough to be answered on air. -- Dennie B. Burke